Archive for month: February, 2016

Halifax film screening picks — Feb 29-Mar 6

29 Feb
February 29, 2016

Carbon Arc has a 7pm screening this Saturday of a Best Foreign Language Film nominee for this year’s Oscars—Theeb, a truly remarkable film set in Jordan one hundred years ago, offering the pleasure of revisiting the spectacular desert vistas of Lawrence of Arabia with the depth of visual field that today’s digital cameras offer. Using non-professional actors for authenticity’s sake, which can be a tricky choice, works perfectly in the case of these Bedouin debutants, and I found I was contemplating the ending for days after I saw this film.

Before that, on Friday, Carbon Arc has two screenings of the equally well-reviewed Turkish coming-of-age tale Mustang, and in the 9pm slot on Saturday there’s a screening of the 52-minute documentary Strange and Familiar: Architecture on Fogo Island, followed by an informal reception to launch Darrell Varga’s new book: Shooting from the East: Filmmaking on the Canadian Atlantic.

Meanwhile at the multiplex this Friday, “awesomely named Norwegian helmer Roar Uthaug has made an equally impressive tsunami-peril thriller — a thunderous rumble-rumble-hustle-hustle-glub-glub nerve-racker that hits all the same beats as its Hollywood equivalents, right down to the implausible group hug at the end.” Yep, it’s The Wave, and if it is half as much fun to watch as it seems this review was to write, it should be a pretty good time.

The annual Women in Film and Television Atlantic conference called Women Making Waves (WMW) is happening this week, with a couple of screenings of note. On Thursday at the Company House it’s  Ingrid Veninger’s He Hated Pigeons, which, as per the director’s preference and practice for this film, is presented with unique live accompaniment, this time by Holly Arsenault. On Friday there’s a showcase of low-budget films directed by women, both Atlantic Canadian and international.

The Dalhousie Art Gallery’s Wednesday evening noir series continues this week with the 1948 Abraham Polonsky film Force of Evil, with John Garfield.

Out of town, there are final chances to see Carol on the big screen in Liverpool on Wednesday and Annapolis Royal on Friday. Fundy Cinema in Wolfville has Laurie Anderson’s Heart of a Dog on Wednesday and, on Sunday, two screenings of Suffragette, a film that took a PR hit with some marketing missteps, but still managed to pull in double its budget at the box office.

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  • In theatres, new & notable:
  • Halifax area screening picks for this week:
    • Wednesday (Mar 2) — Force of Evil, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Abraham Polonsky, USA, 1948, 78 minutes.
    • Thursday (Mar 3) — He Hated Pigeons, The Company House, 2202 Gottingen St, 8pm, $10. Ingrid Veninger, Canada/Chile, 2015, 80 minutes.
    • Friday (Mar 4) — Mustang, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm & 9pm, $7. Deniz Gamze Ergüven, France/Turkey/Germany, 2015, 97 minutes.
      The Wave, Cineplex Park Lane, 7pm & 9:30pm, regular pricing. Roar Uthaug, Norway, 2015, 105 minutes.
      — Inspire/Innovate: a Showcase of Low-budget Films Directed by Women, The Regency Ballroom @ The Lord Nelson Hotel, 8pm, $10.
    • Saturday (Mar 5) — Theeb, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Naji Abu Nowar, Jordan/UAE/Qatar/UK, 2014, 100 minutes.
      — Strange & Familiar: Architecture on Fogo Island, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 9pm, $7, followed by reception to launch Darrell Varga book. Marcia Connolly & Katherine Knight, Canada, 2015, 52 minutes.
  • Annapolis Valley and South Shore screening picks for this week:
    • Wednesday (Mar 2) — Carol, Astor Theatre (59 Gorham Street, Liverpool), 7pm, $8. Todd Haynes, USA, 2015, 118 minutes.
      Heart of a Dog, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 7pm, $9. Laurie Anderson, USA, 2015, 75 minutes.
    • Saturday (Mar 5) — Carol, King’s Theatre (209 St. George St., Annapolis Royal),  7pm, $8. Todd Haynes, USA, 2015, 118 minutes.
    • Sunday (Mar 6) — Suffragette, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 4pm & 7pm, $9. Sarah Gavron, UK, 2015, 106 minutes.

2016 Oscar nominees for Best Documentary Feature + The Act of Killing (Netflix Canada picks)

29 Feb
February 29, 2016

For me there’s a clear choice for best documentary feature among this year’s five nominees, and it’s the one that’s not yet on Netflix Canada—The Look of Silence. But each of the other films brings something worthwhile.  The winner in this category, Amy, is a skillfully constructed biopic, brilliantly edited and genuinely moving in moments. If it has a flaw for me, it’s that its two-hour-plus running time gave this viewer too much time to think about the way the film underplays Winehouse’s agency both in the course of her career and her addictions. What Happened, Miss Simone?, on the other hand, does a remarkable job of conveying the complexity of Nina Simone, but possibly offers a little too much screen time to her abusive husband—half as much would have been enough to convince me of his awfulness.

Cartel Land contains enough incredible hand-held camera work, and remarkable access to Mexican vigilantes, cartel leaders and workers, to reward a viewing. It is, however, the weakest of this field, partly because the vigilantes on the American side of the border are not particularly compelling. Winter on Fire, on the other hand, makes for intensely taut viewing from start to finish. It is to the Ukraine Maidan uprising what The Square was to the Egyptian Revolution of 2011—both won the People’s Choice Documentary Award at TIFF, and both were subsequently purchased and distributed by Netflix—and what it lacks in the latter’s balanced portrayal of political factions, it perhaps makes up for in the pure intensity of its harrowing footage.

In Canada right now, iTunes is your only option for watching The Look of Silence online, but its predecessor, filmed more or less simultaneously, The Act of Killing is on Netflix, and, frankly, you really need to see both. In terms of content they each stand alone perfectly well, but in terms of film ethics and politics, it’s really impossible to fully judge one without the other. These are important films, more important, it’s fair to say, than all of this year’s other nominees put together.

 

Halifax film screening picks — Feb 22-28

22 Feb
February 22, 2016

It’s Oscars week, and so we can no doubt look forward to much foofaraw for a list of nominees “whiter than a Yeti in a snowstorm fighting Tilda Swinton,” but this also happens to be a good week in Halifax to build your awareness of black filmmakers and cultural history. This Thursday at Pier 21 you can catch local actor, activist, and filmmaker Cory Bowles presenting his short films, and joining a panel for a Q&A. As well, a couple of snowstorm-rescheduled screenings from two weeks ago are happening: the Radical Imagination Project is showing The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 at the Central Library on Monday, and the Dal Art Gallery concludes its Tuesday screenings of “First Films by Black Filmmakers” with Dear White People.

The gallery’s Wednesday evening noir series continues this week as well, with a representative of Jean Renoir’s “American exile” period, The Woman on the Beach, with Robert Ryan and Joan Bennett.

Carbon Arc has Friday screenings of the latest cinematic adaptation of Macbeth, which, as I’ve previously mentioned, notably features Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, and—appropriately for the Scottish Play—Scottish accents across the board, which have been variously described in the British media as “almost-perfect” and “mangled.”

Cycling nerds can rejoice that Marinoni: Fire in the Frame, which previously played Carbon Arc, is touring across Canada and hitting Nova Scotia this week, specifically Wolfville on Monday, Liverpool on Wednesday, and, indeed, Halifax on Thursday.

In other out-of-town screenings this week, the King’s Theatre film series in Annapolis Royal is back up and running, with Mavis! on Tuesday and Spotlight on Saturday. Fundy Cinema also has Spotlight on Sunday, but if I were to recommend one film road trip this week, it would be this Wednesday to Wolfville for Rams, which I saw at the most recent Atlantic Film Festival, and enjoyed immensely.

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  • In theatres, new & notable:
  • Halifax area screening picks for this week:
  • Annapolis Valley and South Shore screening picks for this week:
    • Monday (Feb 22) — Marinoni: The Fire in the Frame, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 7pm, $12 advance/$15 door, filmmaker Q&A. Tony Girardin, Canada, 2014, 90 minutes.
    • Tuesday (Feb 23) — Mavis!, King’s Theatre (209 St. George St., Annapolis Royal),  7:30pm, $8. Jessica Edwards, USA, 2015, 80 minutes.
    • Wednesday (Feb 24) — Marinoni: The Fire in the Frame, Astor Theatre (59 Gorham Street, Liverpool), 7pm, $12 advance/$15 door, filmmaker Q&A. Tony Girardin, Canada, 2014, 90 minutes.
      — Rams, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 7pm, $9. Grímur Hákonarson, Iceland/Denmark, 2015, 92 minutes.
    • Saturday (Feb 27) — Spotlight, King’s Theatre (209 St. George St., Annapolis Royal),  7pm, $8. Tom McCarthy, 2015, USA, 129 minutes.
    • Sunday (Feb 28) — Spotlight, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 4pm & 7pm, $9. Tom McCarthy, 2015, USA, 129 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — Feb 15-21

15 Feb
February 15, 2016

I cannot tell you how pleased and surprised I am to find that the new Coen brothers comedy Hail Caesar!“the only movie anyone will ever make that features both Marcuse and Saul of Tarsus as characters, along with a scene that perfectly captures the look and feeling of late Stalinist Soviet propaganda films”—is such an achievement. I’m as influenced by marketing campaigns as the next person, and I was expecting something much fluffier than what we got.

Perhaps the most notable film in the Dal Art Gallery’s “First Films by Black Filmmakers” Tuesday series for African Heritage Month, screening Tuesday at 5pm, is a recently restored, nearly lost masterwork—Kathleen Collins’s Losing Ground, from 1982, the first feature drama directed by a black woman. “She films with a transformative simplicity, reminiscent of the style of Roberto Rossellini, unfolding daily activities with forthright beauty and didactic clarity,” said New Yorker film critic Richard Brody, when the restored edition of this film—that never had a theatrical release—made its debut at the Lincoln Center last year.

The gallery’s Wednesday evening noir series continues this week as well, with what is probably my all-time favourite noir, Out of the Past, with Robert Mitchum and Kirk Douglas.

Docu-nerds, and exploration nerds, rejoice—a Thursday screening at the Central Library of the landmark 2008 John Walker doc about the Franklin expedition, Passage, features an after-screening panel with the director as well as Rear-Admiral John Newton, and the NSCAD prof who literally wrote the book on the film, Darrell Varga.

Carbon Arc has a Friday screening of the first Colombian film to be nominated for the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film—Embrace of the Serpent: “an absorbing account of indigenous tribes facing up to colonial incursions, revealing how Westerners are in many ways far behind the native peoples they conquer.

Carol and Room are no longer playing in Halifax, but have screenings this Wednesday in Liverpool and Sunday in Wolfville, respectively. On Wednesday, Wolfville also gets the new Michael Moore documentary Where To Invade Next, which I don’t believe has yet played Halifax.

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  • Halifax area screening picks for this week:
    • Tuesday (Feb 16) — Losing Ground, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 5pm, free. Kathleen Collins, USA, 1982, 86 minutes.
    • Wednesday (Feb 17) — Out of the Past, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Jacques Turner, USA, 1947, 97 minutes.
    • Thursday (Feb 18) — Passage, Halifax Central Library, 6pm, free. John Walker, Canada, 2008, 108 minutes. Followed by panel with director, film scholar Darrell Varga & Rear-Admiral John Newton.
    • Friday (Feb 19) — Embrace of the Serpent, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Ciro Guerra, Colombia, 2015, 125 minutes.
  • Annapolis Valley and South Shore screening picks for this week:
    • Wednesday (Feb 17) — Carol, Astor Theatre (59 Gorham Street, Liverpool), 7pm, $8. Todd Haynes, USA, 2015, 118 minutes.
      Where to Invade Next, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 7pm, $9. Michael Moore, USA, 2015, 110 minutes.
    • Sunday (Feb 21) — Room, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 4pm & 7pm, $9. Lenny Abrahamson, USA, 2015, 118 minutes.

The Duke of Burgundy; The Beast (Netflix Canada picks)

12 Feb
February 12, 2016

If Berberian Sound Studio mines the history of giallo horror for its meta-cinematic thrills, The Duke of Burgundy, director Strickland’s follow-up, does the same for ’70s art house erotica—”a domestic drama that has fallen out of the hands of a sleazier genre,” he says. Except that here, while the main title, and the conceptually appealing setup of an alternate world populated entirely by women, feel quite “meta,” the story winds its way from the specifics of a role-playing sadomasochistic relationship to the universals of human love—”all done with a poise and high seriousness that still contains a squeak of humour, at an insect-type frequency.”

Strickland’s inspiration, the ’70s sexploitation films—directors like Jess Franco, Tinto Brass, Ken Russell—are not to be found on Netflix, with the strange single exception of The Beast by Valerian Borowczyk. “Finally! I saw a wolf-like beast creature ejaculating repeatedly on a naked Victorian woman. My life has come full circle,” says one user review on Netflix, but I can’t help noticing that the same reviewer gives the film three stars. This “frothing-at-the-mouth artsploitation juggernaut” has its deeply problematic aspects, as you would have to expect, but it is also weirdly compelling in moments, no thanks, or maybe partly thanks, to a completely unconvincing beast costume. The film starts off with some unflinchingly filmed live horse copulation, and builds from that tone-setter. The restored film image is quite excellent, presumably from the same master as 2014’s Blu-ray box, which sold out and is now going on Amazon for several times its initial price. Go figure.

 

I Origins; While We’re Young (Netflix Canada picks)

10 Feb
February 10, 2016

I Origins has gathered more mixed reviews than any other film that I’ve recommended, I think, and I understand why it divides opinion—here is a movie that tries really hard, no doubt too hard, to come up with a plot you haven’t seen before. Its middle third is easily its strongest, as the film narrowly survives the schmoopiness of its initial meet-cute, before taking some truly unexpected turns on its way to a Shyamalanesque finish. Yet, as another earnest mashup of sci-fi, spiritual philosophy, and romantic melodrama, it has a lot of the fine qualities of Mike Cahill’s preceding—more artistically and financially successful—Another Earth, including another excellent performance by Brit Marling. This is worth a look if originality is what you specifically crave.

I haven’t really been on the Noam Baumbach wagon from the beginning—I personally can’t make it far enough across the generational divide to fully appreciate Frances Ha, and I guess I’m not alone in that—but While We’re Young pleases me in every way. Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts are fully on target as a fortysomething couple whose childless way of life leaves them alienated from their contemporaries and alternately romanticizing and mistrusting their new millennial friends—Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried, perfectly cast. Being actually funny is the hardest thing for a comedy to do. Here is one that makes it look easy.

 

Halifax film screening picks — Feb 8-14

08 Feb
February 8, 2016

Are you a cheap valentine? Why spend $125 to buy the John Cassavetes box set for your special someone, when you can take him or her to see all five films this weekend for seven bucks per person per movie? That’s the irresistible value proposition from Kazan Co-op starting this Friday evening, as they screen the Blu-ray editions of Opening Night, Shadows, A Woman Under the Influence, Faces, and The Killing of a Chinese Bookie at The Waiting Room in a weekend event they are calling Valentine to Cassavetes. Advance tickets are available if you want to avoid a Valentine’s letdown.

This week kicks off with two of the best screenings of African Heritage Month: the Radical Imagination Project is showing The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 at the Central Library on Monday, and the Dal Art Gallery continues its Tuesday screenings of “First Films by Black Filmmakers” with Dear White People. The gallery’s Wednesday evening noir series continues as well, this week with the Fritz Lang Graham Greene adaptation Ministry of Fear.

Update: Due to the storm closures of Feb 8 & 9, Black Power Mixtape has been rescheduled to Feb 22, and Dear White People has been rescheduled to Feb 23.

Carbon Arc has a Friday screening of Laurie Anderson’s extremely well-reviewed cine-memoir of her late beloved piano-playing and finger-painting dog LolabelleHeart of a Dog.

In Wolfville this week, Fundy Cinema has a Valentine’s Day screening of 45 Years. Charlotte Rampling is up for a Best Actress award at this month’s Oscars for her performance opposite Tom Courtenay in this film, but that hasn’t garnered a fraction of the attention that she has gained for some shockingly retrograde comments on the Oscars’ diversity deficit.

Cineplex’s “Great” Digital Film “Festival” continues through Thursday at Park Lane with a mix of ’80s-centric cult-y and blockbuster-y action-y stuff.

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  • Halifax area screening picks for this week:
    • Update: Due to the storm closures of Feb 8 & 9, Black Power Mixtape has been rescheduled to Feb 22, and Dear White People has been rescheduled to Feb 23.
      Monday (Feb 8) — The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975, Halifax Central Library, 6:30pm, free. Göran Olsson, Sweden, 2011, 100 minutes.
      Runaway Train, Cineplex Park Lane, 9:50pm, $6.99. Andrei Konchalovsky, USA, 1985, 110 minutes. More Great Digital Film Festival screenings here.
    • Tuesday (Feb 9) — Dear White People, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 5pm, free. Justin Simien, USA, 2014, 108 minutes.
      — Mad Max: Fury Road, Cineplex Park Lane, 5pm, $6.99. George Miller, Australia/USA, 2015, 120 minutes. More Great Digital Film Festival screenings here.
    • Wednesday (Feb 10) — Ministry of Fear, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Fritz Lang, USA, 1944, 86 minutes.
      The Thing (1982), Cineplex Park Lane, 9:55pm, $6.99. John Carpenter, USA, 1982, 109 minutes. More Great Digital Film Festival screenings here.
    • Thursday (Feb 11) — Runaway Train, Cineplex Park Lane, 12:25pm, $6.99. Andrei Konchalovsky, USA, 1985, 110 minutes. More Great Digital Film Festival screenings here.
    • Friday (Feb 12) — Heart of a Dog, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Laurie Anderson, USA, 2015, 75 minutes.
      Opening Night, Kazan Co-op @ The Waiting Room, 6040 Almon St., 7pm, $7, advance tickets available. John Cassavetes, USA, 1977, 144 minutes.
    • Saturday (Feb 13) — Shadows, Kazan Co-op @ The Waiting Room, 6040 Almon St., 2pm, $7, advance tickets available. John Cassavetes, USA, 1959, 87 minutes.
      — A Woman Under the Influence, Kazan Co-op @ The Waiting Room, 6040 Almon St., 7pm, $7, advance tickets available. John Cassavetes, USA, 1974, 155 minutes.
    • Sunday (Feb 14) — Faces, Kazan Co-op @ The Waiting Room, 6040 Almon St., 2pm, $7, advance tickets available. John Cassavetes, USA, 1968, 147 minutes.
      — The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, Kazan Co-op @ The Waiting Room, 6040 Almon St., 7pm, $7, advance tickets available. John Cassavetes, USA, 1976, 135 minutes.
  • Annapolis Valley screening pick for this week:
    • Sunday (Feb 14) — 45 Years, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 4pm & 7pm, $9. Andrew Haigh, UK, 2015, 95 minutes.

Barton Fink; O Brother, Where Art Thou? (Netflix Canada picks)

05 Feb
February 5, 2016

Films come and go on Netflix (ok, lately, there’s less come and more go), but you can usually find a sampling of the Coen brothers oeuvre, and right now, perhaps to help hype this weekend’s release of Hail, Caesar!, the sampling is pretty strong: The Big Lebowski, Miller’s Crossing, Raising Arizona, Inside Llewyn Davis. But the long-underappreciated Barton Fink continues to be a favourite of mine. A completely unblocked film about writer’s block (sharing that honour, and Judy Davis, with Naked Lunch), and a thoroughly uncompromised film about artistic compromise, it remains one of their least financially successful films, and a Rosetta Stone that unlocks much of the rest of their work. If you haven’t seen these performances by John Goodman and John Turturro, you haven’t seen everything they can do.

O Brother, Where Art Thou? is an equally intellectually devious concoction, but one that audiences found much more easily consumable, partly due to some memorable comic moments, but in large measure due to its fantastic soundtrack—a record that rebooted a whole genre of folk, perhaps at the expense of being massively overplayed. But watching the film’s series of set pieces flow along over these songs remains a treat, as are its callbacks to The Odyssey and Preston Sturges’ Sullivan Travels—from which it borrowed its title, its period setting, and a scene setup or two. It is quite simply a masterclass in how to build on layers of reference without making that the whole point of the exercise.

A note about transfers—O, Brother, with a lifetime box-office 9 or 10 times that of Barton Fink, has fared well in home video, and the version on Netflix seems to be taken from the same master as the 2011 Blu-ray. Fink, however, has still not received a proper clean-up or domestic Blu-ray release, though the comparatively shoddy disc that was released in Europe in 2012 is region-free and thus watchable here. The Netflix version appears to have been pulled from the 2003 DVD master, which, though lacking the contrast and detail of the Blu-ray, is pillar-boxed and thus retains the full, uncropped image that viewers saw in theatrical release.

 

Halifax film screening picks — Feb 1-7

01 Feb
February 1, 2016

This past Wednesday was International Holocaust Remembrance Day, and presumably not coincidentally, Cannes 2015 Grand Prix winner Son of Saul arrived in Halifax on Friday. I was extremely impressed with the film on first viewing, and the method it adopts to present events in a Nazi concentration camp, its “atrocities taking place just out of view with the film’s careful sound design filling in the gaps in our comprehension.” But something didn’t quite sit right with me as I thought about it afterwards, for reasons that have perhaps best been articulated in this Adam Nayman response. I do, though, continue to think highly of the film’s intelligence and craft, and I definitely encourage you to see it and consider your own response.

Hey! Carbon Arc is back for a winter season!  This Friday’s kickoff event starts with Hitchcock/Truffaut, a doc about Francois Truffaut’s weeklong 1962 interview with Alfred Hitchcock, and continues with a live taping of the podcast Lens Me Your Ears, hosted as usual by Stephen Cooke and Carsten Knox. On Saturday there are two screenings of Boy & the World, nominated for Best Animated Feature Film at this year’s Oscars. Those screenings are fundraisers for this effort to bring a Syrian refugee family to Halifax.

For African Heritage Month, the Dal Art Gallery is adding a series of 5pm Tuesday screenings: “First Films by Black Filmmakers.” This week’s choice is the film that launched Spike Lee’s career, She’s Gotta Have It. The Wednesday evening noir series continues as well, this week with the 1944 Otto Preminger classic Laura, with Gene Tierney.

In Wolfville this week, Fundy Cinema notably has two films by women about women: on Wednesday, Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, which I haven’t seen but have been totally sold on by the trailer, and on Sunday, the Brazilian domestic drama The Second Mother, which previously played Carbon Arc.

Finally, can someone please explain to me Cineplex’s Great Digital Film Festival, which puts “sci-fi, fantasy and cult films back on the big screen”, which presumably might appeal to many university-age viewers, and programs many of the screenings in the daytime—the week before those viewers are actually off from school. Yeah there’s some crap on the list but I’ll concede there’s a choice nugget here and there as well.

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  • Halifax area screening picks for this week:
    • Tuesday (Feb 2) — She’s Gotta Have It, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 5pm, free. Spike Lee, USA, 1986, 84 minutes.
    • Wednesday (Feb 3) — Laura, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Otto Preminger, USA, 1944, 88 minutes.
    • Friday (Feb 5) — Hitchcock/Truffaut, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Kent Jones, France/USA, 2015, 79 minutes, followed by podcast taping at 8:45pm.
      Looper, Cineplex Park Lane, 9:55pm, $6.99. Rian Johnson, USA, 2012, 118 minutes. More Great Digital Film Festival Friday screenings here.
    • Saturday (Feb 6) — Boy & the World, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm & 9pm, price TBD. All Abreu, Brazil, 2013, 80 minutes.
      Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior, Cineplex Park Lane, 7:30pm, $6.99. George Miller, Australia, 1981, 94 minutes.
      Mad Max: Fury Road, Cineplex Park Lane, 9:55pm, $6.99. George Miller, Australia/USA, 2015, 120 minutes. More Great Digital Film Festival Saturday screenings here.
    • Sunday (Feb 7) — Labyrinth, Cineplex Park Lane, 9:55pm, $6.99. Jim Henson, UK/USA, 1986, 102 minutes. More Great Digital Film Festival Sunday screenings here.
  • Annapolis Valley screening picks for this week:
    • Wednesday (Feb 3) — Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 7pm, $9. Lisa Immordino Vreeland, USA, 2015, 95 minutes.
    • Sunday (Feb 7) — The Second Mother, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 4pm & 7pm, $9. Anna Muylaert, Brazil, 2015, 112 minutes.