Archive for category: Halifax Screening Picks

Halifax film screening picks — June 8-14

08 Jun
June 8, 2015

Last year the Halifax Independent Filmmakers Festival showed the singularly excellent doc feature Manakamana, and this year it looks to have another excellent choice in Jem Cohen’s Museum Hours. Cohen will be in attendence for a Q&A, and will also be showing a preview of his single-screen adaptation of his recent multi-screen documentary portrait of Cape Breton, We Have An Anchor.

This ninth edition of HIFF is once again taking place at the Neptune Studio Theatre, over four nights. The festival is as indie-alternative-avant as it gets in Halifax, and the name says it—the spotlight is on makers as well as films, which means Q&As galore and a chance to learn about the craft. In addition to multiple showcases of short films there is also a third feature from Polish directors Anka and Wilhlem Sasnal, the “nearly dialogue-less” Parasite, and the Halifax-shot “no-budget dramedy” Here Kitty, Kitty from Argentina’s Santiago Giralt.

After the festival, this Sunday, you can get your Anna Leonowens on at a couple of Cineplex matinee screenings of The King and I.

This is also an excellent week for a film road trip. One of last year’s very best festival films, the Irish-Troubles-set thriller ’71, is screening Wednesday at the historic Astor Theatre in Liverpool (easily my favourite place in Nova Scotia to see a movie). And this Sunday, the Fundy Film Society is screening Olivier Assayas’ Clouds of Sils Maria, featuring raved-about performances by Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart.

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Tuesday (June 9) — Far From the Madding Crowd, Cineplex Park Lane, 3:35pm, 6:35pm & 9:20‎pm, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). Thomas Vinterberg, UK, 2015, 119 minutes.
  • Wednesday (June 10) — Atlantic Auteurs #1 (Shorts), HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 7pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. 7 films, 78 minutes total film running time, screening details here.
    — Here, Kitty Kitty, HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 9pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. Santiago Giralt, Argentina, 2014, 72 minutes, screening details here.
  • Thursday (June 11) — Atlantic Auteurs #2 (Shorts), HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 7pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. 8 films, 76 minutes total film running time, screening details here.
    Parasite, HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 9pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. Anka & Wilhelm Sasnal, Poland, 2014, 66 minutes, screening details here.
  • Friday (June 12) — [Re]Program (Shorts), HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 7pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. 7 films, 83 minutes total film running time, screening details here.
    Museum Hours, HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 9pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. Jem Cohen, Austria/USA, 2012, 106 minutes, screening details here.
  • Saturday (June 13) — Danis Goulet Retrospective (Shorts), HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 7pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. 3 films, 37 minutes total film running time, screening details here.
    CFAT Artist-in-Residence Lisa Lipton (Video), HIFF @ Neptune Scotiabank Studio Theatre, 7pm, $10/$7 film workers & students, tickets here. 2 short works, 22 minutes total running time, screening details here.
  • Sunday (June 14) — The King and I, Cineplex Oxford & Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 12:55pm, $6. Walter Lang, USA, 1956, 133 minutes.

Here are my South Shore & Annapolis Valley screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Wednesday (June 10) — ’71, Astor Theatre (59 Gorham Street, Liverpool), 7pm, $8. Yann Demange, UK, 2014, 99 minutes.
  • Sunday (June 14) — Clouds of Sils Maria, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 8pm, $9. Olivier Assayas, Germany/France/Switzerland, 2014, 123 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — June 1-7

01 Jun
June 1, 2015

June is here, and that means that it’s road trip season—and one of my favourite Nova Scotia summer activities is getting out of town and checking out some of the excellent film series screenings around the province.  Starting this week, and through the summer, I’ll be adding Annapolis Valley and South Shore film screenings to my weekly picks.

There are a couple of excellent such opportunities this week. On Tuesday, the King’s Theatre Film Society in Annapolis Royal has Red Army, the feature doc (carrying an exec-producer credit for Werner Herzog) that tells the story of the most successful dynasty in sports history—the Soviet national hockey team, from the perspective of captain Slava Fetisov. And on Sunday, the Fundy Film Society in Wolfville has Phoenix, the 2014 festival favourite that re-teams the director (Christian Petzold) and star (Nina Hoss) of Barbara, one of my favourites from 2012.

Meanwhile in Halifax, Saturday you can check out “Incredifest – The Incredible Film Festival” which in a bit of perhaps genre-appropriate marketing overstatement, bills itself as “the best independent science fiction, fantasy and horror films from around the world” but is really just a two-hour showcase of 12 short films followed by a low-profile Japanese-ish zombie feature from 2011, Schoolgirl Apocalypse.  But with local talent like Jason Eisener (“One Last Dive”) and Angus Swantee (“Torturous”) on the short film lineup it seems like an excellent bet for genre fans. Note: the festival website refers to the venue as the “Maritime Museum of Natural History,” but it seems otherwise clear that the screenings are at the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History and not the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic.

The Dal Art Gallery noir series wraps up this Wednesday with Robert Wise’s Odds Against Tomorrow, starring Harry Belafonte—”one of the final films in the Noir cycle, a heist-gone-wrong flick that directly addresses race issues, all to a cool Modern Jazz Quartet soundtrack.”

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Tuesday (June 2) — Far From the Madding Crowd, Cineplex Oxford, 6:45pm & 9:20‎pm, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). Thomas Vinterberg, UK, 2015, 119 minutes.
    Ex Machina, Cineplex Park Lane, 9:15pm‎; Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 9pm‎, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). Alex Garland, UK, 2015, 108 minutes.
  • Wednesday (June 3) — Odds Against Tomorrow, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Robert Wise, USA, 1959, 95 minutes.
  • Saturday (June 6) — Incredifest Short Film Screenings, Museum of Natural History, 6pm, $10 (or $15 combined with 8pm feature screening).
    Schoolgirl Apocalypse, Museum of Natural History, 8pm, $10 (or $15 combined with 6pm short films screening). John Cairns, Japan, 2011, 86 minutes.

Here are my Annapolis Valley screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Tuesday (June 2) — Red Army, King’s Theatre (209 St. George St., Annapolis Royal), 7:30pm, $8. Gabe Polsky, USA, 2014, 85 minutes.
  • Sunday (June 7) — Phoenix, Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 8pm, $9. Christian Petzold, Germany, 2014, 98 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — May 25-31

25 May
May 25, 2015

Few films have been as raved about in the past couple of years as this year’s Oscar winner for best foreign-language film, Ida. This weekend it will feature in a two-film mini-festival of Polish films, presented by the Polish-Canadian Society of Nova Scotia, and screening at the University of King’s College.

The Sunday afternoon screening of Ida will be preceded on Saturday evening by The Death of Captain Pilecki, a 2006 made-for-TV bio-pic directed by Ryszard Bugajski, whose film Interrogation was nominated for the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1990.

The Oxford this week has Thomas Vinterberg’s Far From the Madding Crowd, which you would think would be pretty near the top of any list of most unnecessary remakes—but hey, it’s getting way better reviews than the new Poltergeist, so…

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Monday (May 25) — Oklahoma!, Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 7pm, $6. Fred Zinnemann, USA, 1955, 145 minutes.
  • Tuesday (May 26) — Far From the Madding Crowd, Cineplex Oxford, 4:10pm, 7pm & 9:45‎pm, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). Thomas Vinterberg, UK, 2015, 119 minutes.
    — Ex Machina, Cineplex Park Lane, 4:15pm, 7:20pm & 10:05‎pm‎; Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 2pm, 4:40pm, ‎7:20pm & 9:55pm‎, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). Alex Garland, UK, 2015, 108 minutes.
  • Saturday (May 30) — The Death of Captain Pilecki, U. King’s College: KTS Hall, New Academic Building 2nd floor, 7pm, $5 ($8 for combined ticket with Ida), event details here. Ryszard Bugajski, Poland, 2006, 85 minutes.
  • Sunday (May 31) —  Ida, U. King’s College — KTS Hall, New Academic Building 2nd floor, $5 ($8 for combined ticket with Pilecki), event details here. Paweł Pawlikowski, Poland/Denmark/France/UK, 2013, 82 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — May 18-24

18 May
May 18, 2015

There are not many one-off screenings in Halifax this week (and that’s quite OK, if you’re as excited about Obey Convention as I am), but The Thrillema is back with a screening of the original Poltergeist this Wednesday. With the 2015 remake dropping this Friday, the timing is basically perfect for another look at the OTT original that remains seared into the brains of 80s kids everywhere.

The one documentary screening of note this week is a Fusion Halifax screening of the highly regarded 2006 film The Power of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil. Note that this Central Library screening takes place in room 201.

This Sunday afternoon, the William-Wyler-directed musical Funny Girl, with Streisand and Sharif, is screening at the Oxford. This is a fundraiser for the Halifax Pride Festival.

If you’re looking for some multiplex entertainment on your Victoria Day Monday off, you could do worse than to check out the brilliant Mad Max: Fury Road, which I am convinced has set a new standard against which future action films will be judged. Though the film was not shot with 3D cameras as originally planned, it is quite obviously intended to be seen in 3D—and a successful post-conversion, I’d say. But you probably weren’t depending on me to tell you that…

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Monday (May 18) & Tuesday (May 19) — Mad Max: Fury Road, many screenings at several Cineplex locations‎, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film likely continues through the summer and possibly in perpetuity. George Miller, Australia/USA, 2015, 120 minutes.
    — Ex Machina, Cineplex Park Lane, 1:10pm,‎ ‎3:45pm, 7:20pm & 9:50‎pm‎; Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 11:55am,‎ ‎2:35pm, 5:15pm, ‎7:50pm & 10:25pm‎, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). Alex Garland, UK, 2015, 108 minutes.
    — While We’re Young, Cineplex Park Lane, 3:55pm &‎ ‎10pm, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). ‎The highly-regarded latest feature from Noah Baumbach stars Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts. USA, 2014, 97 minutes.
  • Wednesday (May 20) — Poltergeist (1982), The Thrillema @ the Museum of Natural History, 8pm, free advance tickets. Tobe Hooper, USA, 1982, 114 minutes.
  • Thursday (May 21) — The Power of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil, room 201 @ Halifax Central Library, 6:30pm, free, short discussion to follow. Faith Morgan, USA, 2006, 53 minutes.
  • Sunday (May 24) — Funny Girl, Cineplex Oxford, 1pm, $5. William Wyler, USA, 1968, 155 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — May 11-17

11 May
May 11, 2015

Cineplex Oxford and Dartmouth Crossing are both showing Ex Machina this week—the extremely well-received directorial debut of Alex Garland, the screenwriter for Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later and Sunshine. One of the many four-star reviews online comes from Matt Zoller Seitz, who effuses: “real science fiction is about ideas, which means that real science fiction is rarely seen on movie screens, a commercially minded canvas that’s more at ease with sensation and spectacle… Ex Machina is a rare and welcome exception to that norm.”

This Wednesday it will be 100 years, and exactly one week, since the birth of Orson Welles, and the Dal Art Gallery film noir series will be screening the unimpeachable, but not unrevisable, classic Touch of Evil, which is famous not only for its opening eight-minute tracking shot, but also for its chicanerous release & redaction history. The UK Blu-ray release has no less than five presentations of the film, including the theatrical release version, a preview release version, and the 1998 reconstructed version, which I suspect is what we will see on Wednesday.

The Radical Imagination Project has another free Monday urban-issues doc screening, this one in association with the Mayworks Festival, and on Tuesday AFCOOP has an interesting free screening—12 aboriginal Canadian shorts from the past decade, selected by Ariel Smith. The Ottawa International Animation Festival has more information about the program here.

All of this week’s one-off screenings are crammed into three nights, but hopefully Ex Machina and/or While We’re Young will stick around and offer some filmgoing options for the rest of the week.

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Monday (May 11) — Portrait of Resistance: The Art and Activism of Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge (Mayworks Halifax Festival event presented by the Radical Imagination Project), Halifax Central Library, 7pm, free, details here. Roz Owen, Canada, 2011, 72 minutes.
  • Tuesday (May 12) — Ex Machina, Cineplex Oxford, 6:45‎ ‎& 9:30‎, Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 11:55am,‎ ‎2:35pm,‎ ‎5:15pm,‎ ‎7:55pm, &‎ ‎10:35pm, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). Alex Garland, UK, 2015, 108 minutes.
    — While We’re Young, Cineplex Oxford, 6:45pm &‎ ‎9:15pm, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). ‎The highly-regarded latest feature from Noah Baumbach stars Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts. USA, 2014, 97 minutes.
    Welcome to Kanata,  AFCOOP – 5663 Cornwallis Street, 7pm, free. A touring package of contemporary animated films by Canadian aboriginal filmmakers, curated by Ariel Smith, award-winning filmmaker and Director of the National Indigenous Arts Coalition. 12 films, 80 minutes total running time, event details here, program details here.
  • Wednesday (May 13) — Touch of Evil, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Orson Welles, USA, 1958, 110-ish minutes.
    — Oklahoma!, Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 7pm, $6. Fred Zinnemann, USA, 1955, 145 minutes.
    Heritage Minutes, Cineplex Park Lane, 6:30pm, free. Historica Canada presents a selection of classic Heritage Minutes, followed by the premiere of a brand new Heritage Minute.

Halifax film screening picks — May 4-10

04 May
May 4, 2015

With Montage of Heck not scheduled to screen on HBO Canada at any time in the foreseeable future, the only legal way to see the Kurt Cobain documentary in this country is to go to a one-off theatre screening tonight at 7pm.

Cineplex has a number of other special event screenings this week as well, including a live Rifftrax commentary-screening of the love-to-hate-it indie The Room on Wednesday, as well as family-friendly screenings this weekend of The Wizard of Oz and Oklahoma!.

There are just 3 weeks left in the Dal Art Gallery noir series and this week’s selection is noteworthy for being in colour and directed by the Canadian-born Allan Dwan—Slightly Scarlet, with John Payne, Rhonda Fleming, and Arlene Dahl.

The Mayworks Halifax festival continues this week with an AFCOOP-presented showcase of short films—Reel Justice.

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Monday (May 4) — Montage of Heck, Cineplex Park Lane & Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 7pm, regular pricing. Brett Morgen, USA, 2015, 132 minutes.
  • Tuesday (May 5) — While We’re Young, Cineplex Oxford, 6:45pm &‎ ‎9:15pm, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continues through Thursday (at least). ‎The highly-regarded latest feature from Noah Baumbach stars Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts. USA, 2014, 97 minutes.
  • Wednesday (May 6) — Reel Justice (Mayworks Halifax Festival short films presented by AFCOOP), Halifax Central Library, 6:30pm, free. 11 films, 94 minutes total running time, details here.
    Slightly Scarlet, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Allan Dwan, USA, 1956, 99 minutes.
    — Rifftrax Live: The Room, Scotiabank Theatre Halifax, 9pm, regular pricing. The MST3K guys give the treatment (one time broadcast via satellite) to ” the most baffling and hilarious independent film ever produced.” 120 minutes, info and trailer here.
  • Saturday (May 9) — The Wizard of Oz, Scotiabank Theatre Halifax & Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing & Cineplex Lower Sackville, 11am, $2.99. Victor Fleming, USA, 1939, 101 minutes.
  • Sunday (May 10) — Oklahoma!, Cineplex Oxford & Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 12:55pm, $6. Fred Zinnemann, USA, 1955, 145 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — April 27-May 3

27 Apr
April 27, 2015

This Wednesday is Canadian Film Day, and there are two or perhaps three screenings happening to mark it. Carbon Arc has its final screening of its spring film season with On the Trail of the Far Fur Country, a documentary that follows what happens when the 1920 (two years before Nanook of the North!) silent documentary film The Romance of the Far Fur Country is rediscovered and taken back to the communities where it was shot. The Atlantic Film Festival is presenting an afternoon screening of the Don-McKellar-helmed Newfoundland comedy The Grand Seduction, and if the Canadian Film Day website is to be believed, the Scotiabank Cinema in Bayers Lake has a 7pm screening of the Daniel-Radcliffe-starring rom-com The F Word—though this has yet to be confirmed on the Cineplex website.

The Radical Imagination Project is back with another gentrification-themed Monday documentary screening at the Central Library, this time with a local angle. This screening includes Shelagh Mackenzie’s 1991 doc Remembering Africville, along with the 2012 documentary My Brooklyn.

The Thrillema is back this week as well—with a planned screening of The Road Warrior shut down by the Warner legal department, the replacement is Streets of Fire (1984)—”a rock n’ roll fable of motorcycles, mayhem, street gangs, and Willem Dafoe.” All this and Diane Lane, too.

The latest instalment in the Dal Art Gallery noir series is 1955’s The Big Combo—an especially visual striking instance of the genre.

Last but definitely not least, Rhymes for Young Ghouls, which is screening in a number of Canadian locations as part of Canadian Film Day, is screening here the next day at the opening of the Mayworks Halifax Festival, at the Central Library. The 2013 feature is a historic-fictional story of revenge, focusing on a Mi’kmaq Indian youth thrown into a residential school. It won the Best Canadian Feature Film award at the 2013 Vancouver International Film Festival.

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Monday (Apr 27) — My Brooklyn & Remember Africville, Halifax Central Library, 7pm, free. Kelly Anderson, USA, 2012, 85 minutes | Shelagh Mackenzie, Canada, 1991, 35 minutes.
  • Tuesday (Apr 28) — Streets of Fire, The Thrillema @ the Museum of Natural History, 8pm, free advance tickets. Walter Hill, USA, 1984, 93 minutes.
    —  It Follows, Scotiabank Cinema Bayers Lake, 12:05‎pm, 2:25‎pm, 4:50pm,‎ 7:40pm,‎ 10:00pm‎, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continuing through Thursday (at least). David Robert Mitchell, USA, 2013, 97 minutes. Smart-horror sensation in the fifth week of its Halifax run.
  • Wednesday (Apr 29) — The Grand Seduction, Halifax Central Library, 2pm, free. Don McKellar, Canada, 2013, 115 minutes.
    —  On the Trail of the Far Fur Country, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Kevin Nikkel, Canada, 2014, 80 minutes.
    The F Word, Scotiabank Cinema Bayers Lake, 7pm. Michael Dowse, Ireland/Canada, 2013, 101 minutes.
    — The Big Combo, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Joseph H. Lewis, USA, 1955, 84 minutes.
  • Thursday (Apr 30) — Rhymes for Young Ghouls, Halifax Central Library, 7:15pm, preceded by opening address and All Nations Drummers at 6:30pm, free. Jeff Barnaby, Canada, 2013, 88 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — April 20-26

20 Apr
April 20, 2015

There is a pretty confusing event listing in The Coast that suggests there are Monday and Tuesday screenings of the documentary Highway of Tears this week—but both screenings are on Monday—6pm at Spatz Theatre, and 7PM at the Bus Stop Theatre. This documentary, which premiered at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival in Toronto last year, chronicles the notorious, decades-long string of murders and disappearances of young Indigenous women along British Columbia’s Highway 16. These are fundraiser screenings for the Loretta Saunders Scholarship Fund, and there will be post-screening Q&As hosted by director Matt Smiley with Loretta’s sister, Delilah Saunders.

It’s a good week for fans of short films by emerging filmmakers.  The week kicks off with a screening of short films by NSCAD film students at Cineplex Park Lane, starting with thesis films at 6pm (see this article in The Coast), and then the Film 1&2 shorts at 7:30pm.

Then the Emerging Lens Cultural Film Festival opens Wednesday, 6:30pm at the Central Library, and continues through Saturday with free screenings at daVinci College on Thursday and the Black Cultural Centre on Friday and Saturday. Opening night features a five-film lineup that includes the notable 12-minute short “Righteous” by the estimable Cory Bowles.

The Dal Art Gallery noir series continues this week with the only classic film noir to be directed by a woman—The Bigamist (1953), directed by and starring Ida Lupino.

The Novel Tech Ethics screening of Waltz With Bashir, originally scheduled for March 19, is now happening this Thursday. The politically problematic yet widely praised animated war documentary will be followed by an expert panel discussion on the topics of post-traumatic stress disorder, trauma, memory, and coping & resilience.

Carbon Arc will wrap up its spring series of Friday screenings this week with Marinoni: The Fire in the Frame, a documentary about legendary bike racer and bike builder Giuseppe Marinoni.

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

Halifax film screening picks — April 13-19

13 Apr
April 13, 2015

Inescapably this week’s major film story in Halifax is the provincial Liberal government’s ruthless and shortsighted gutting of the local industry in last week’s budget. Seems like the right time to rally around and celebrate one of the classics of local production of the past two decades. Thom Fitzgerald’s docu-drama homage to mid-2oth-century muscle magazines premiered at Sundance in 1999, and this Sunday there’s an opportunity to have a fresh look—there’s a special OUTEast Film Festival benefit screening at the Company House. This is a $10/ticket fundraiser in support of a couple of local plays that will be travelling to the Dublin Gay Theatre Festival in May.

Speaking of revisiting mid-20th-century myth-making, The Radical Imagination Project has another screening at the central library in their gentrification-themed film series tonight. The well-regarded 2010 documentary The Pruitt-Igoe Myth seeks to unearth what really happened in the large-scale urban renewal projects of the time, specifically the titular redevelopment in St. Louis, and to reinstate its residents as worth protagonists in their drama of survival and adaptation.

Ever seen Joseph Losey’s remake of Fritz Lang’s M? Yeah, me neither, but even the concept of having Losey take a crack at that story seems pretty intriguing to me. Dal Art Gallery’s film noir series, artfully curated by Ron Foley MacDonald, offers up this 1951 version at this Wednesday’s screening.

Carbon Arc this Friday has the Zellner brothers’ English/Japanese Fargo-referencing meta-fable Kumiko: The Treasure Hunter, which I haven’t seen either but which looks thoroughly intriguing. I dig this pull-quote from Todd McCarthy: “A work of rigorously disciplined eccentricity, Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter is at once entirely accessible and yet appealing only to a rarified crowd ready to key into its narrow-bandwidth sense of humor.”

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Monday (Apr 13) — The Pruitt-Igoe Myth, Halifax Central Library, 7pm, free, presented by the Radical Imagination Project. Chad Freidrichs, USA, 2011, 79 minutes.
  • Tuesday (Apr 14) — It Follows, Scotiabank Cinema Bayers Lake, 2:10‎pm, 4:50pm,‎ 7:35pm,‎ 10:00pm‎, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continuing through Sunday (at least)—times changing slightly on Friday. David Robert Mitchell, USA, 2013, 97 minutes. Smart-horror sensation in the third & fourth week of its Halifax run.
  • Wednesday (Apr 15) — M, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Joseph Losey, USA, 1951, 88 minutes.
  • Friday (Apr 17) — Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter, 7pm, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, $7. David Zellner, USA, 2014, 104 minutes.
  • Sunday (Apr 19) — Beefcake, 7pm, The Company House – 2202 Gottingen St, $10 advance tickets here. Thom Fitzgerald, Canada, 1999, 97 minutes.

Halifax film screening picks — April 6-12

06 Apr
April 6, 2015

“Everyone should see Damián Szifrón’s Wild Tales… catch it as part of a crowd and you may experience an all-too-rare phenomenon when the first segment ends: a cinema full of people cheering and applauding.” That’s just a taste of Nicholas Barber’s piece in The Guardian arguing that Wild Tales could inspire the return of the anthology film, or as the Brits like to call them, portmanteaux. This Friday you can see it in Halifax at a Carbon Arc screening.

Carbon Arc also has a Wednesday screening this week of Xavier Dolan’s cathartic 2014 Cannes Jury Prize winner Mommy, co-presented with Alliance Française Halifax and Séries FICFA.

The Dal Art Gallery noir series this Wednesday has In A Lonely Place, one of the essential films by the great director Nicholas Ray (Rebel Without a Cause, Bigger Than Life, Johnny Guitar). Humphrey Bogart stars in this adaptation of the novel by Dorothy Hughes.

Here are my Halifax area screening picks for selected days this week:

  • Monday (Apr 6) — The Sound of Music, Cineplex Dartmouth Crossing, 7pm, $6. Robert Wise, USA, 174 minutes. Final screening for this engagement.
  • Tuesday (Apr 7) — It Follows, Scotiabank Cinema Bayers Lake, 2:10‎pm, 4:50pm,‎ 7:40pm,‎ 10:05pm‎, regular pricing discounted Tuesday, film continuing through Sunday. David Robert Mitchell, USA, 2013, 97 minutes. Smart-horror sensation in the second & third week of its Halifax run.
  • Wednesday (Apr 8) — In a Lonely Place, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 8pm, free. Nicholas Ray, USA, 1950, 94 minutes.
    Mommy, 7pm, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, $5 suggested donation. Xavier Dolan, Canada, 2014, 138 minutes.
  • Friday (Apr 10) — Wild Tales, 7pm, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, $7. Damián Szifrón, Argentina & Spain, 2014, 122 mins.