Archive for category: Halifax Screening Picks

Halifax screening picks — October 9-15

09 Oct
October 9, 2017

It took 35 years, but a second Blade Runner instalment has arrived. I will hopefully have more to say about it in the next day or two, but if forced to boil down my reaction, I will say Blade Runner 2049 is both an unprecedented visual marvel, and inexcusably retrograde from a feminist point of view—the latter fact seemingly contributing to its underperformance at the box office.

Carbon Arc Cinema this Friday is showing the documentary Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World, “a celebratory examination of the often-underappreciated role played in the development of American popular music by singers, musicians, and songwriters of Native American ancestry.” After the screening, at 9pm, everyone is invited to come discuss Carbon Arc’s plans for a full-time cinema. I definitely plan to be there so I hope you’ll come join in.

This week also features a couple of free screenings of note. Tuesday evening at the Central Library it’s the remarkable and daring Timbuktu, introduced by Zack Miller.  And the “Russian Revolutions” series of screenings continues this Thursday afternoon with the 1967 film Commissar, the only feature film directed by Aleksandr Askoldov—”a requiem for Soviet Jewry, not a popular subject among officially approved Soviet movie makers, writers or scholars.”

This Sunday afternoon the Cineplex Classic Films series returns with another shot of Audrey Hepburn goodness in My Fair Lady, which Charlotte Alter defends as “about a strong woman attempting to retain her identity in spite of the controlling machinations of a small-minded man.”

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  •  In theatres, notable
  • Halifax screenings this week:
    • Tuesday (Oct 10) — Timbuktu, Central Library, 6:30pm, free, introduced by Zack Millerl. Abderrahmane Sissako, France/Mauritania, 2014, 96 minutes.
    • Thursday (Oct 12) — Commissar, Dalhousie Art Gallery, 2:30pm, free. Aleksandr Askoldov, USSR, 1967, 110 minutes.
    • Friday (Oct 13) — Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Catherine Bainbridge & Alfonso Maiorana, Canada, 2017, 103 minutes.
    • Sunday (Oct 15) — My Fair Lady, Cineplex Park Lane, 1pm & Dartmouth Crossing, 12:55pm, $6.99. George Cukor, USA, 1964, 170 minutes.

Halifax screening picks — October 2-8

02 Oct
October 2, 2017

There’s no question that the cinematic highlight of this week is this Saturday’s free Central Library screening of the 1925 silent classic Strike, featuring live musical accompaniment by player, composer, and ethnomusicologist Mohammad Sahraei and four other musical guests. Sergei Eisenstein’s first feature-length film is “a raucous, rousing hymn to human dignity and courage.”

“At the turn of the twenty-first century,” writes Steve Erickson, “Wong Kar-wai was the most exciting director in the world, and 2000’s In the Mood for Love is his greatest movie.” This Tuesday you can see this classic for free at the Central Library, introduced by Chris Campbell. Incidentally, there is a new restoration from original elements in the pipeline, which will be premiering October 22 as the closing film of the Lumière Festival—as Criterion is one of the partners in this new edition, we can likely expect a fresh replacement next year of their 2012 Blu-ray release.

Wednesday in Wolfville, you can check out a well-regarded animated feature that hasn’t played in Nova Scotia since 2016’s Atlantic Film Festival—Window Horses (The Poetic Persian Epiphany of Rosie Ming). Alissa Simon wrote in Variety that “the film provides a counterweight to our xenophobic times, proving that human beings are more alike than unalike and that poetry can be relevant across millennia.”

Carbon Arc continues its fall season this Friday with the latest from Thomas Vinterberg (The Hunt, The Celebration, Far From the Madding Crowd), The Commune—”the film’s craft is pristine, deftly fabricating intimacy without suffocating either us or the characters.” All of the advance tickets have already been sold for this one, but there will be a few available at the door.

This Sunday at Carbon Arc’s screening room at the Museum of Natural History, there is another Iranian film screening in Halifax, but Oxidan hasn’t been to the festivals so it’s impossible to find an English-language review online. Interestingly though, this comedy by director Hamed Mojhammadi, about a man who impersonates a Catholic priest to get a visa to the UK, has been attacked by conservative Iranian MPs and threatened with a ban, apparently for “insults against holy religions” and the possibility of causing discord among the great Iranian people.”

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  •  In theatres, notable
  • Halifax screenings this week:
    • Tuesday (Oct 3) — In the Mood for Love, Central Library, 6pm, free, introduced by Chris Campbell. Wong Kar-wai, Hong Kong, 2000, 98 minutes.
    • Friday (Oct 6) — The Commune, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Thomas Vinterberg, Denmark, 2016, 90 minutes.
    • Saturday (Oct 7) — Strike, Central Library, 7:30pm, free. Sergei Eisenstein, USSR, 1925, 82 minutes.
    • Sunday (Oct 8) — Oxidan, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 6pm, $13 advance tickets. Hamed Mohammadi, Iran, 2017, 95 minutes.
  • South Shore & Annapolis Valley screenings this week:
    • Monday (Oct 2) — Maudie, Astor Theatre (59 Gorham Street, Liverpool), 1:30pm & 7pm, $8. Aisling Walsh, Ireland/Canada, 2016, 115 minutes.
    • Wednesday (Oct 4) — Window Horses (The Poetic Persian Epiphany of Rosie Ming), Acadia Cinema’s Al Whittle Theatre (450 Main Street, Wolfville), 7pm, $9. Ann Marie Fleming, Canada, 2016, 88 minutes.

Halifax screening picks — September 25-October 1

25 Sep
September 25, 2017

The Oxford Theatre has closed, the film festival is over, but it’s not all bad news for Halifax film lovers… Carbon Arc is back! The fall season of the cinema series opens with the Catherine Deneuve and Catherine Frot vehicle The Midwife, a film that, in timely fashion, is “about attaining the wisdom that comes from forgiveness and the acceptance of those things — namely the past and the future — that none of us can control.” Online advance tickets have already sold out, but a limited number of tickets will be reserved for purchase at the door.

Wednesday the Cineplex Studio Ghibli retrospective continues with the Japanese-language version of director Hayao Miyazaki’s classic debut, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, playing at Park Lane and Dartmouth Crossing.

Long Time Running, the new documentary by Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier that charts the 2016 goodbye tour of The Tragically Hip, is “deeply sad and positively triumphant” and “everything we need it to be,” says Norm Wilner. It’s exclusively at Cineplex Park Lane.

David Gordon Green has had a strange, zig-zagging directorial career but his latest, Stronger, a Boston Marathon bombing aftermath story, with Jake Gyllenhaal and Tatiana Maslany, seems like it might be worth a look.

  • In theatres, seen & recommended:
  •  In theatres, notable
  • Halifax screenings this week:
    • Wednesday (Sep 27) — Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, Japanese w English subtitles, Cineplex Park Lane, 4pm & 7pm, Dartmouth Crossing, 7pm, $12.95. Hayao Miyazaki, Japan, 1984, 124 minutes.
    • Friday (Sep 29) — The Midwife, Carbon Arc Cinema @ the Museum of Natural History, 7pm, $7. Martin Provost, France/Belgium, 2017, 117 minutes.
    • Saturday (Sep 30) — Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, English dub, Cineplex Park Lane, 1:15pm, $12.95. Hayao Miyazaki, Japan, 1984, 124 minutes.
  • South Shore screenings this week:
    • Saturday (Sep 30) — Maudie, Astor Theatre (59 Gorham Street, Liverpool), 7pm, $8. Aisling Walsh, Ireland/Canada, 2016, 115 minutes.
    • Sunday (Oct 1) — Maudie, Astor Theatre (59 Gorham Street, Liverpool), 7pm, $8. Aisling Walsh, Ireland/Canada, 2016, 115 minutes.

Halifax screening picks — September 22-24

22 Sep
September 22, 2017

Long Time Running, the new documentary by Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier that charts the 2016 goodbye tour of The Tragically Hip, is “deeply sad and positively triumphant” and “everything we need it to be,” says Norm Wilner. It’s exclusively at Cineplex Park Lane.

David Gordon Green has had a strange, zig-zagging directorial career but his latest, Stronger, a Boston Marathon bombing aftermath story, with Jake Gyllenhaal and Tatiana Maslany, seems like it might be worth a look.

Sunday the Cineplex Studio Ghibli retrospective continues with the English dub of director Hayao Miyazaki’s classic debut, Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, playing at Park Lane and Dartmouth Crossing.

Halifax screening picks — September 14-21 (film festival edition)

14 Sep
September 14, 2017

The Atlantic International Film Festival runs September 14-21. Here are the ten films that I am most interested in (*asterisks indicate that I’ve already seen and I’m recommending personally):

 

Halifax screening picks — September 11-13

11 Sep
September 11, 2017

I’m in Toronto right now, enjoying the 2017 edition of TIFF, so I’m posting a brief update covering the next three days. Before the Atlantic International Film Festival kicks off in Halifax on Thursday, I’ll post another update with some festival picks.

Word has definitely got around about the final screenings at the Oxford Theatre—at time of writing, with three days of film programming left, all remaining screenings are sold out, except for a Tuesday screening of the very best film of the lot, City Lights. The Oxford will be such a tremendous loss that it’s hard to contemplate.

Also on Tuesday at the Central LibraryZack Miller introduces the remarkable 2002 film City of God.

I’ll be back soon with my festival picks.

Halifax screening picks — September 4-10

04 Sep
September 4, 2017

The impending closing of the Oxford Theatre is a terrible loss to film lovers, a knife to the heart, as Carsten Knox puts it. While Wolfville, Liverpool, and Annapolis Royal, to name a few Nova Scotia towns, still have well-used historic theatres as cinematic venues, Halifax can’t seem to manage it, and if it can, it hasn’t been given a chance.

The theatre will be seen out with a number of classic film screenings starting this Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

Today, local Cineplex theatres are turning Labour Day Monday into Miyazaki Monday, with screenings of My Neighbour Totoro, Kiki’s Delivery Service, and Castle in the Sky—check the Monday listings for Cineplex Park Lane, Dartmouth Crossing, and Lower Sackville.

On Tuesday at the Central Library, the Featured Director series of free screenings of Stanley Donen classics continues with Zack Miller introducing On the Town, the film that opened the door to location-based musicals.

Close Encounters of the Third Kind is back in a sparkling restored 40th anniversary edition, while the film can be restored, its cultural moment is very much history. And speaking of culture and history, Yiddish cinema is back, and now is your opportunity to catch “a rare example of Yiddish neorealism” on local screens in Menashe.

Halifax screening picks — August 28-September 3

28 Aug
August 28, 2017

Good Time marks the emergence of the filmmaking Safdie brothers into the mainstream, sort of, and the certification of Robert Pattinson as a ridiculously talented actor (if Cosmopolis and Maps to the Stars, among others, didn’t convince already). It’s the quintessential almost-can’t-watch-but-can’t-look-away film, but my recommendation this week is that you watch, while it’s still here. I can also highly recommend as a post-screening listen this episode of the Film Comment podcast featuring Pattinson, the Safdies, co-writer Ronald Bronstein, and FC editor Nicolas Rapold at a sneak preview in NYC.

The Trip to Spain is garnering positive reviews, though not at the level of its essential, brilliant predecessors, The Trip and The Trip to Italy, but this review by David Ehrlich has me hoping for another fine instalment. But honestly it doesn’t matter—if Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon decide their next collaboration entails reading their grocery lists, I am here for it.

I’m also here for the 3D conversion of Terminator 2: Judgment Day, even though I am historically not a fan of digital post-conversion. As the 3D trend continues to recede, director James Cameron’s 2010 words about quickie conversions now seem prescient: “They will probably work against the adoption of 3D because they’ll be putting out an inferior product.” But this post-convert was no quickie, employing a team of more than 1,400 artists and technicians working for a year.

On Tuesday at the Central Library, the Featured Director series of free screenings of Stanley Donen classics continues with Zack Miller introducing Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, known for its remarkable dance numbers.

This Wednesday the Cineplex Studio Ghibli retrospective continues with the Japanese version (subtitled in English) of Castle in the Sky playing at Dartmouth Crossing and Park Lane.

Halifax screening picks — August 21-27

21 Aug
August 21, 2017

It’s a good week in Halifax for fans of Japanese animation. At Park Lane you can see In This Corner of the World, a coming of age tale set in pre-war Japan, and based on a manga that ran from 2007 to 2009. Nerdist.com says that, according to the press notes, director Sunao “Katabuchi and his team spent years researching how Kure and Hiroshima looked at the time, making sure every building, house on the hill, Japanese naval vessel in the harbor, and even road was historically accurate.” And on Sunday there is another instalment of this year’s Studio Ghibli retrospective, with the English dub of Castle in the Sky playing at Dartmouth Crossing and Park Lane.

On Tuesday at the Central Library, the Featured Director series of free screenings of Stanley Donen classics continues with Tara Thorne introducing Funny Face, featuring a one-off team-up of Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire.

David Lowery’s “film of mesmerizing visual ideas and conceptual integrity,” A Ghost Story, continues at Park Lane and also screens Wednesday afternoon and evening in Liverpool at the historic Astor Theatre. Meanwhile the latest demonstration of Steven Soderbergh’s fondness for the caper-film genre, Logan Lucky, is playing just about everywhere.

Halifax screening picks — August 15-20

14 Aug
August 14, 2017

Pretty much everything is on summer hiatus at the moment, but there is another screening of Hitchcock’s North by Northwest on Wednesday.